8 Startups that Just Graduated from Joyful Frog

Singapore’s Joyful Frog Digital Incubator (JFDI) presented its second 2015 batch in a demo day last night. The eight startups that graduated are a pretty international bunch; Singapore, Russia, China, the US, Israel, and Norway are some of the countries represented.

The teams went through the accelerator’s 100-day program to get to this demo day. JFDI has put S$50,000 (US$35,500) into each startup accepted into the program, getting a fixed 8.88 percent equity stake in return. It also pledges to participate in the most successful startups’ seed round with S$70,000 (US$50,000) per startup.

"Entrepreneurship will always be difficult but it doesn’t have to be random and it doesn’t have to be lonely," JFDI CEO Hugh Mason told the demo day audience. "The results of the systematic process these teams have been through are clear today, as is the commitment from everyone in our community."

JFDI’s second batch of 2015 graduates. Photo credit: JFDI

Here are the startups graduating at the demo day, in alphabetical order:

CodeCloud

CodeCloud is a US startup with offices in New York, Singapore, and Seoul. It provides mobile app development services by matching you to a relevant project with your desired development role, or matching you with a mentor to help you master another role. It’s both a project management and communication tool and a learning tool for developers.

CurrentDraw

Chinese startup CurrentDraw is a web app for electrical design. It has collaborative features similar to those of Google Docs, allowing users to create, work together on, and review designs through their browser. CurrentDraw also includes a marketplace function, where users can search for and purchase components for their designs. The marketplace has a wide selection of items and offers information on technical specifications, suppliers, manufacturers, prices and comparison, and available stock.

Eventory

Eventory helps you create a mobile guide for events. It allows you to manage your event, connect with your attendees, and provide relevant updates and news. For event attendees, the iOS and Android app acts as a personal guide and networking tool for the conference they’re in.

Execuvite

No, it’s not a typo, although Google might think so. Execuvite has Singaporean, US, and Israeli roots and is an online platform where freelancers can come together and collaborate on a project. The website provides discovery, collaboration, and project management tools so teams can form, communicate, and work together without leaving the site.

Fynd

Singapore’s Fynd is one of those "Uber for [insert function here]" startups. In this case, the function in question is mobile phone screen repair, laptop and computer repair, and data recovery and IT support. The startup sends someone to your doorstep to help with your tech crisis, and promises speedy repairs that won’t break the bank.

Infogym

Infogym hails from Norway. The startup reinvents the gym experience with software. It features online training guides, complete with 3D animations showing the correct way to exercise and the effects thereof. It also allows you to create, follow, and tweak your own training program. And if you own a gym, Infogym creates a 3D environment of it, so you can use it for promotion and marketing.

Play2Lead

Australian/Russian startup Play2Lead gamifies corporate training and audience engagement. The mobile app allows an employer or a content creator to make quizzes and poll questions and reward participation and engagement with points and certain prizes.

RoomFilla

Thailand’s RoomFilla operates in the room rental space dominated by the likes of Airbnb. The startup helps property owners who want to put their accommodation up for rental to make the most out of it by working with the right partner sites. RoomFilla partners with sites from Airbnb to HouseTrip, Wimdu, and PandaBed. The company was part of Tech in Asia Singapore 2015’s Arena line-up.

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